In society

At Avantium, sustainability is built into our very purpose. It drives our employees, informs our technology development and excites our commercial partners. Every technology we develop affirms our commitment to helping create a fossil-free future for the planet.

Managing environmental footprint

Life Cycle Analysis (LCA)

Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) is fundamental to understanding how Avantium’s technologies compete with fossil-based alternatives, as well as the potential sustainability benefits of our technologies. If you consider the source – plants instead of oil-, internal calculations show that the CO2 equivalent of our technologies is significantly lower than the CO2 equivalent of fossil-based alternatives. Those calculations will be validated by independent Life Cycle Analyses (LCA).

Avantium has conducted an initial Global Warming Potential (GWP) evaluation of the YXY process in collaboration with the Copernicus Institute at the University of Utrecht (Eerhart et al. 2012). A broader LCA, taking into consideration various PEF based applications and additional sustainability denominators, is due to be performed by the German-based nova-Institut.

Avantium is working with the German firm Thinkstep (a Sphera company) to evaluate the sustainability of Ray Technology.

Team for GREEN

We also examine how we use resources at our buildings and facilities and look for ways to improve this. ‘Team for Green’ is a group of Avantium employees, drawn from across the company, who drive ‘bottom up’ environmental initiatives to enhance sustainability implementation at our company’s headquarters in Amsterdam. Recent initiatives include improved policies and practices on waste and recycling, drinking water use, as well as making recommendations on greater access for bicycles and the use of green energy to power the building.

Promoting greener employee travel

Under our Avantium Mobility Plan, we encourage the use of public transport wherever possible. Employees choosing to travel by public transport receive an NS Business chip card which may be used for all work and personal transport across the Netherlands, including train, metro, tram and bus travel, as well as use of the OV bike system.

We take care of each other

In Avantium, we are working to enrich our knowledge and understanding and to change our behavior. Therefore, we will immerse ourselves in a new safety theme every three months. A few examples of the quarterly safety themes that we have had so far:

  • Giving and accepting feedback
  • The acknowledgement and recognition of unsafe situations
  • Electrical awareness
  • Housekeeping

Safety first

Safety is our highest priority in everything that we do. All Avantium employees committed to a list of so-called Golden Safety Rules. These rules remind us every single day that we take safety very serious in Avantium. We have implemented our Golden Safety Rules, we have procedures, we have good safety systems in place, but we all know that it requires continuous attention and awareness (behavior & culture) to make sure that we operate in a safe manner.

Golden safety rules

We are responsible of our own safety and that of others

We give and accept feedback, we ask when in doubt

We learn from our mistakes and those of others

We take the time to work in a safe way

We make sure our work area is clean and tidy

We use the right protective equipment

We assure immediate containment of unsafe situations

We report every unsafe situation

Exciting

the new

generation

Avantium uses its scientific expertise to excite the next generation about sustainability and renewable chemistry. Several PhD students are working on their theses at Avantium, whilst contributing to the development of our technologies. Furthermore, Avantium has hosted multiple programs and lab tours for children and high school students to teach them how renewable chemistry can contribute to a more sustainable future.  We have held an open ‘Weekend of Science’ to attract young students’ attention to the opportunity innovation will play in the journey to a fossil-free world.

Lecture: making plastic

The majority of plastic is made from fossil resources. In this video chemist Bert Weckhuysen (Utrecht University) shows how polyesters are made. He also explains whether it would be possible to make plastics from natural materials, and why it is a very bad idea if all these new plastics are biodegradable!

Pin It on Pinterest